#LTHEChat 56: Innovative Pedagogy in Higher Education, with Prof. Ale Armellini (@alejandroa)

This week’s #LTHEchat is focusing on innovative pedagogy in higher education. A challenging topic and one that encourages us to think more deeply about our roles and responsibilities to students and the impact that our choices has upon them.

This weekend I listened to an interesting podcast by Hybrid Pod, which included an interview with Janine DeBaise. During this interview Janine suggests that we should engage more critically with pedagogies and question where they have come from.  Why is this approach now popular? Who is pushing this? Janine encourages us to think more about the unintended side effects of different types of teaching approaches.

With this in mind, I am looking forward to facilitating this week’s chat and reading everyone’s perspective on this topic…

#LTHEchat

Armellini Ale headshot Armellini Ale @alejandroa

Professor Alejandro Armellini is the Director of the Institute of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education at the University of Northampton. The mission of the Institute is to enable transformational learning experiences through inspirational teaching. Ale’s key role is to provide leadership in the area of learning and teaching across all schools and services.

Ale has extensive international teaching and programme development experience across different education sectors. Over the years, he has used, researched and refined the structured CAIeRO process (elsewhere known as Carpe Diem) and other evidence-based design-for-learning interventions to promote positive change in HE provision across modes of study. Teams under his leadership have researched the application of learning technologies in diverse academic settings. His PhD tutees research specific areas in the field of educational technology, pedagogy, openness and innovation. He is active in consultancy work globally.

During this week’s chat, Ale will be exploring…

View original post 85 more words

#LTHEChat 55 : Bilingual German/English May 18th – Opening-up HE for non-traditional students, Martina Emke

This week’s #LTHEChat will be a bilingual exploration (German and English) of opening up HE to non-traditional students. I strongly recommend having a read of Martina Emke’s thought provoking blog post, which introduces the topic. How can we enable students to draw on their experiences outside of university to keep their studying relevant and personal? What techniques do you use to balance the needs of traditional and non-traditional students? There are lots of things to consider in this, perhaps even, to play devils advocate, if any distinction should be made between traditional and non-traditional students at all? Have a read and don’t forget to join us on Wednesday 18th 8-9pm BST for this fascinating and bilingual #LTHEchat!

#LTHEchat

#LTHEChat 55: Die Öffnung der Hochschulen für nicht-traditionelle Studierende

OFFENE_HOCHSCHULE_portraits_00986 Martina Emke @martinaemke

Who are non-traditional students? According toa 2015 report by theNational Center for Education Statistics (NCSC) there is no clear definition. However, there seem to be some characteristics that many non-traditional students (NTS) share: NTS often study part-time, work full-time and have dependents. Another common factor seems to be that for many NTS the support of university staff and the institution, to help increase their confidence in learning and address practical and personal issues, is crucial for their success at university study (Field, Merrill & West, 2012).

NTS already possess professional knowledge and work experience which influence their attitude towards studying. Research suggests that they are interested in applying knowledge and that they are determined and committed to learning and studying because they have clear goals, which are often connected to pursuing a professional career (Johnson…

View original post 534 more words